9/11/2012

 

A few weeks ago, while coordinating a night for my sister and I to have dinner with relatives in from the West Coast, I ran through the potential dates in my head.

“September 10th is a Monday, but that doesn’t work for me, that leaves the 11th, 12th or 13th…there’s something on that Tuesday the 11th…can’t recall but I know there’s something…damn my terrible memory!”

Today’s crisp weather and cloudless sky mimicked the weather on that day (September 10, 2012).

 

It was only after we’d made reservations that it hit me. 9/11.  I was horrified it had slipped past me like that. How could I not have realized?

Was it possible that exactly a year after the 10th anniversary, that historic and horrific day was beginning to fade in my conscience? I convinced myself it must have been because I was thinking  “September” in my head instead of referring to the date as 9/11.

Every year since it happened, the 11th of September has been windy. I can’t help but think of souls, spirits, making their presence known.

Last year, on the occasion of the tenth anniversary, I recounted the day from my perspective, starting with waking up on September 11th, 2001 to the news a plane had hit the Tower.

This year, on the eleventh anniversary I’m sharing photos taken of my visit to the 9/11 Memorial this past July 4th with my friend Sharon.

Flowers at WTC memorial

 

It’s still very much an active construction site. Naively, I hadn’t considered the possibility of waiting in line to go through airport-like security (what planet am I living on?!).

Being at the memorial is both sobering and peaceful. The Memorial, while mostly under ground, has immense presence. It demands respect.

 

The sound of crashing water is powerful and commands attention. The white noise it creates leaves no room for extraneous thoughts, forcing complete presence of mind.

Click here if you don’t see the video below.

The Memorial is easy to navigate. Each block of marble denoted by a letter and number. If you are looking for someone’s name, you plug it into the kiosk and are directed to a numbered chunk of marble in either the North or South tower footprint.

A sobering discovery were they words “and unborn child” carved into the stone next to the names of pregnant women who perished that day.

(The 9/11 Museum under construction – you can see the Freedom Tower off to the left)

At the memorial’s exist stands a lone policeman. In that moment he is every policeman. Tourists ask him to pose for photographs, they shake his hand, thank him and even hug him.

In that moment he is every son, brother and father who lost their life that day. In that moment, I’m proud to be an American. And damn proud to be a New Yorker.

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  • thanks for sharing tamar…very powerful, indeed.

  • Beautiful post, Tamar.
    Beautiful tribute.
    xo

    • Thanks Debbie (and Katie of course!). xoxoxox

  • A powerful, beautiful, and moving tribute. Thank you for this, Tamar.

    • Thank YOU Ingrid. I’m glad I was able to convey at least a little of how I feel and that it resonated in some way. xo

  • Thank you, Tamar, for such beautiful post. I have tears in my eyes.

    • Thanks Daniela, from a great writer from you that is quite the honor.

      • Oh, you are too kind and humble, my friend. I love and admire your writing!

  • catchatcaren

    and I am proud to know you. This was just wonderful, as are YOU.

    • Stop, you’re gonna make me cry (again!). xo

  • annameow

    beautiful. perfect. thank you, Tamar.

  • I can never forget that horrible, horrible day! Thank you for posting this.

    • Thanks Malinda, for taking the time to leave me a note. It means the world.

  • rollie

    Thank you for sharing. Living in Colorado naturally separates me from 9/11 to some degree. Your excellent descriptions and video brought it home.

    • Thanks Rollie, for your readership and for taking the time to let me know this post connected for you.

  • sharon

    I remember how policemen and firemen were almost considered celebrities back in 2011 after this tragedy. Sad that it takes a life-altering, devastating event to appreciate what they do. Seeing the tourists at the memorial ask the police guy for a photo made me recall this.

    Nice post, Tamar. Thanks for sharing.

  • sharon

    I remember how policemen and firemen were almost considered celebrities back in 2011 after this tragedy. Sad that it takes a life-altering, devastating event to appreciate what they do. Seeing the tourists at the memorial ask the police guy for a photo made me recall this.

    Nice post, Tamar. Thanks for sharing.

  • sharon

    I remember how policemen and firemen were almost considered celebrities back in 2011 after this tragedy. Sad that it takes a life-altering, devastating event to appreciate what they do. Seeing the tourists at the memorial ask the police guy for a photo made me recall this.

    Nice post, Tamar. Thanks for sharing.

  • sharon

    I remember how policemen and firemen were almost considered celebrities back in 2011 after this tragedy. Sad that it takes a life-altering, devastating event to appreciate what they do.

    Nice post, Tamar. Thanks for sharing.

  • sharon

    I remember how policemen and firemen were almost considered celebrities back in 2011 after this tragedy. Sad that it takes a life-altering, devastating event to appreciate what they do.

    Nice post, Tamar. Thanks for sharing.

  • Tears, this is very moving, the metaphor of the wind on the anniversary each year, the policeman, and the video of the sound. Thank you!

    • Thanks Bernadette, it means a lot. I was worried I hadn’t taken enough time to write it so I’m happy to hear my sentiments came across.

      • It was loud and clear. Sometimes that quick draft in a hurry is the best.

  • Marilia Bavaresco

    This date will never forget!

  • Thanks for this. Like you, I feel the spirits in the wind even after all these years. I moved here from Canada, a few weeks before 9/11 and married a few weeks after. In my 9/11 post at Boomer Muse today I went more Zen this year. Still it hurts. (((hugs)))

    • Thanks Layla. Yes it does still hurt.

  • www.thecrazyragdollcatlady.com

    I am not american, nor do I live in the U.S.A., but I feel for this day.

    it hit me now that september eleven went by without me thinking about it. maybe because I was getting ready to travel to another country on september 12th, maybe because i barely got online and didnt watch any tv for the last 24 hours…
    but while on instagram i saw a picture kim kardashian posted and read the comments. so much hate, so many people judging each other… it really made me sad.
    Muslims saying americans deserved it, pointing fingers at jews, and having fingers pointed at them. Mentions of inside jobs and other conspiracy theories.

    It really saddened me to see that all the hate that made 9/11 happen is still very much alive. 🙁

  • Texas A Cat in New York

    We remember. Thanks for this beautiful tribute.

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